Who Is Taking Care of the Caregivers?

Did you know that according to the 2012 Report by the Alzheimer’s Association, over 15 million Americans provide unpaid care for a person with Alzheimer’s or some other form of dementia? f  The report, at page 27, also states that 80% of the care provided at home is given by family caregivers and that fewer than 10%  of older adults receive all of their care from paid workers.  The study also shows, in colorful bars, the proportionally larger number of caregivers of people with dementia (as compared with caregivers of older people) who provide assistance with activities of daily living (getting out of bed, dressing, toileting, bathing, managing incontinence, and feeding) along with the larger number of those dementia caregivers for both the 1-4 years and the 5+ years categories for the length of time of caregiving.  Page 31 of the report demonstrates that dementia caregivers suffer from 1.5 greater emotional stress level than the other elder adult caregivers, while the physical stresses were slightly lower. This report is very eye-opening.  One of my first questions about this is  – who is taking care of the caregivers?

Fortunately, the Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado offers assistance in the form of classes and workshops for people who are touched by Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.   A helpful list of resources available in Colorado can be found here.  Dementia care is stressful on a number of levels, so you may want to make sure that financial, legal and medical arrangements are already in place for the affected person.

So how do dementia caregivers of family members cope with the stress? I am a regular practitioner of yoga, so I was pleased to see this post on “Yoga for Caregivers: Meditation May Lower Depression, Improve Brain Functioning in Dementia Caregivers of 3/13/2012 available here.

Many times a better understanding of the behaviors of people with dementia can be helpful as can adjustments to communication techniques.  The Family Caregiver Alliance offers the following 10 tips:

1.      Set a positive mood for interaction – your attitude and body language communicate your feelings and thoughts stronger than your words.

2.      Get the person’s attention and limit distractions and noise, use nonverbal cues and touch to help keep her focused. If she is seated, get down to her level and maintain eye contact.

3.      State your message clearly, using simple words and sentences. Speak slowly, distinctly and in a reassuring tone. Refrain from raising your voice higher or louder; instead, pitch your voice lower. If she doesn’t understand the first time, use the same wording to repeat your message or question. If she still doesn’t understand, wait a few minutes and rephrase the question. Use the names of people and places instead of pronouns or abbreviations.

4.      Ask simple, answerable questions, and ask them one at a time (those with yes or no answers work best).

5.      Listen with your ears, eyes and heart and be patient in waiting for your loved one’s reply. If she is struggling for an answer, it’s okay to suggest words. Watch for nonverbal cues and body language, and respond appropriately. Always strive to listen for the meaning and feelings that underlie the words.

6.      Break down activities into a series of steps. This makes many tasks much more manageable.

7.      When the going gets tough, distract and redirect. When your loved one becomes upset, try changing the subject or the environment.

8.      Respond with affection and reassurance. People with dementia often feel confused, anxious and unsure of themselves. Further, they often get reality confused and may recall things that never really occurred. Avoid trying to convince them they are wrong. Stay focused on the feelings they are demonstrating (which are real) and respond with verbal and physical expressions of comfort, support and reassurance. Sometimes holding hands, touching, hugging and praise will get the person to respond when all else fails.

9.      Remember the good old days. Remembering the past is often a soothing and affirming activity. Many people with dementia may not remember what happened 45 minutes ago, but they can clearly recall their lives 45 years earlier. Therefore, avoid asking questions that rely on short-term memory, such as asking the person what they had for lunch. Instead, try asking general questions about the person’s distant past—this information is more likely to be retained.

10.  Maintain your sense of humor. Use humor whenever possible, though not at the person’s expense. People with dementia tend to retain their social skills and are usually delighted to laugh along with you.

The tips are from  http://www.caregiver.org

Some of the distressing facts about caregiving are According to the American Medical Association, 16 percent of caregivers have worsened health after they’ve begun caring for someone. And about half of Alzheimer’s disease caregivers go on to develop psychological distress.  So please remember, if you are caring for a person with dementia or want to help support someone who is providing that care, there are many sources of support available, so please take good care of the caregiver and get help if you need it.

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